The Scariest Bridges in the World

bridges-bannerBridges are convenient routes that allow you to get to your destination faster. They connect two roads that are separated by water, valley or other geographical barrier. They’re supposed to be structurally sound and able to put with tons of weight, but would you dare to cross any of these? Hold on to the steering wheel, ’cause one mistake and you may pay for it with your life.

Source: IG code4photography

Source: IG code4photography

Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado, USA

The Royal Gorge Bridge soars over sea level at an astounding 1,053 feet. Built in 1929, it used to be the highest bridge in the world until its title was taken away. High winds would make it very unstable, but fortunately wind  stabilizing cables were attached to it in 1982.

Source: www.colorado.com

Source: www.colorado.com

There was a huge fire in the area surrounding the bridge in 2013, and pretty much everything was destroyed…except the bridge itself! It managed to stay totally intact and untouched.

Source: mackinacbridge.org

Source: mackinacbridge.org

Mackinac Bridge, Michigan, USA

The Mackinac Bridge is located in Michigan, where it serves as a vital connection. It may be the fifth longest suspension bridge in the world, but nothing is longer than this bridge anywhere in the western hemisphere. It’s length is an impressive 26,372 feet. Amazing!

Source: archive.epa.gov

Source: archive.epa.gov

Even though there are stabilizing cables attached to it, you can still feel it swinging to and fro on especially windy days, so make sure you’ve got a good handle on your steering wheel!

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Chesapeake Bay Bridge, Maryland, USA

Maryland’s Eastern Shore is connected to the Western Shore by the impressive Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which takes commuters from rural communities to urban centers, and vice versa. The length of the bridge is 4.3 miles (6.9 km), and it stretches entirely across the blue waters of Chesapeake Bay.

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Tragedy struck the bridge a few years ago: on August 10, 2008, a head-on collision involving a tractor trailer caused it to fall from the bridge, and the driver died.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

If you want to go to the Florida Keys, you have no choice but to cross the Seven Mile Bridge. It’s the only way you can get from mainland Florida by car.

Source: durgasundaram03.blogspot.com

Source: durgasundaram03.blogspot.com

Accidents are aplenty on this bridge, and if one happens while you’re on it, except serious delays. The bridge pretty much closes down until the accident is cleared.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Deception Pass Bridge, Washington, USA

Deception Pass Bridge connects Whidbey Island to Fidalgo Island. The bridge is actually split in two, both of which  have two-lanes.

Source: http://www.everytrail.com/

Source: http://www.everytrail.com/

It might not be as menacing as the other bridges on this list, but it is the most tragic: 425 people have committed suicide here, jumping off the bridge into the murky depths below.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Confederation Bridge, PEI and New Brunswick, Canada

The Confederation Bridge cost taxpayers $1.3 billion to build. Measuring 12.9-kilometre (8 mi)in length, the bridge  crosses the Northumberland Strait so that drivers from New Brunswick and the mainland of Canada can get to popular tourist destination, Prince Edward Island…even in the winter.

Source: mapio.net

Source: mapio.net

In fact, the winters are so cold here that the waters of the strait freeze over. That’s little comfort if you fall off the bridge. 

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Khuiten River Bridge, Mongolia

This short, rickety wooden bridge is in the northern part of Mongolia, in the Altai mountain range where Bayan-Ölgii is located. It only measures 100m but people cross it all the time, on foot and in cars.

Source: http://meo9x.blogspot.ca/2008/09/mongolia-image.html

Source: http://meo9x.blogspot.ca/2008/09/mongolia-image.html

Of course it’s only wide enough for one car, so if you happen to be crossing it while another car is coming in the opposite direction, be prepared to yield the right of way — which means going in reverse until you’re off the bridge.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Captain William Moore Bridge, Alaska, USA

The Captain William Moore Bridge is in Alaska. A suspension bridge, it measures 110 feet and crosses over the Moore Creek Gorge. The waters here flow through a fault line, so you would expect that the bridge would be in tip top condition. You’d be wrong.

Source: www.travelandleisure.com

Source: www.travelandleisure.com

While it was built in 1976, over the decades it’s now in such bad shape that it’s going to be replaced sometime by a crossing structure that won’t be a bridge. It’s not safe enough for cars, but hey, you can still cross it on foot. If you dare.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Volgograd Bridge

Volgograd Bridge (Волгоградский мост) crosses over the Volga River in Russia.  It is a concrete girder bridge, and along with adjacent flyovers, measure 7,110 m (4.42 mi) long. Even though it’s supposed to have all the safety measures put in place to keep it as stable as possible, the bridge was still closed by authorities on May 20, 2010, when strong winds sent bridge dangerously swinging.

Source: findery.com

Source: findery.com

The bridge remained closed for 5 days, when finally the authorities risked their lives to inspect it for damage.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Quepos Bridge, Costa Rica

This rickety old bridge is aptly named the “Bridge of Death”. It connects Jaco to Quepos in Costa Rica.

Source: insidecostarica.com

Source: insidecostarica.com

If you’re crossing over it, be very careful not to fall though or get trapped in the huge gaps on either side, since the planks don’t even run across the whole width.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Victim River Bridge, Russia

Vitim River Bridge is located just 15 meters above the water. That means it won’t hurt so much when you fall off the bridge because of the absence of side rails, right?

Source: www.youtube.com

Source: www.youtube.com

Trains used to cross this bridge, but now it’s just reserved for cars and foot traffic. And since it’s in Russia, you know what happens when wintertime comes — the bridge gets covered in ice and snow, making for a rather interesting crossing.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Millau Viaduct, France

The Millau Viaduct is a structural beauty. It’s a cable-stayed bridge that passes over the valley of the River Tarn, right near Millau located in southern France.

Source: www.amusingplanet.com

Source: www.amusingplanet.com

How much did it cost? Oh, just about €400 million, but it’s beautiful at least, and is recognized as the tallest bridge in the world.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Gandy Bridge, Florida, USA

Gandy Bridge has a tumultuous history. As the southernmost bridge in the US, it spans Old Tampa Bay from St. Petersburg, Florida to Tampa, Florida and was constructed in 1924. However, the original bridge was dismantled in 1975 due to deterioration. Another bridge was constructed in 1956, reserved for vehicles until 1997, but that too was declared unsafe and now it’s only for recreational use and non-motorized traffic.

Source: floridaphotomatt.com

Source: floridaphotomatt.com

Now, people know it as the Friendship Trail Bridge instead. But this friendship wasn’t meant to last forever. It finally closed in 2008 and is currently being demolished because they just couldn’t fix it enough to make it safe. However, you can still use the third (1975) and fourth (1997) spans of the Gandy Bridge if you want instead.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Sunshine Skyway Bridge

The Bob Graham Sunshine Skyway Bridge, is in Florida, spanning Tampa Bay. People don’t really call it that, though. If you want to sound like a local, call it the Sunshine Skyway Bridge instead.

Source: floridaphotomatt.com

Source: floridaphotomatt.com

At an impressive 21,877 feet (4.1 miles or approximately 6.67 km) in length, this bridge was partly destroyed in 1980 by a serious collision. But don’t worry, they fixed it all up.

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Eshima Ohashi Bridge, Japan

The Eshima Shashi Bridge connects Matsue, Shimane Prefecture and Sakaiminato, Tottori Prefecture in Japan. The rigid-frame bridge crosses over Nakaumi lake and took 7 years to build, from 1997 to 2004. But one look, and you’d think it was a rollercoaster and not a bridge.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

While it may be 144 feet tall with a steepness of no more than 6.1%, it sure doesn’t look that way! Hope you buckle up and hold on for the ride!

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Ko Paen Bamboo Bridge, Cambodia

How about crossing a bridge made entirely of bamboo? Try the Ko Paen Bamboo Bridge, a 1.5km long bamboo structure that spans the waters of the Mekong River in Cambodia.

Source: www.youtube.com

Source: www.youtube.com

Sure, it gets washed away every year during the monsoon season, but don’t worry — they just remake the bridge again!

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Deosai Bridge, Pakistan

Yes, it sags in the middle. Yes it’s made of wooden planks and rope.

Source: www.shughal.com

Source: www.shughal.com

But how else are you going to get to Deosai national park from Sardu in Pakistan?

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Source: Wiki Commons/CC License

Trift Suspension Bridge, Switzerland

The Trift Suspension Bridge in Switzerland is a footbridge that spans part of the mountains of the Alps. This bridge is the longest and highest pedestrian suspension bridge in the country. A new one was built in 2009, featuring higher handrails and stabilizing cables.

Source: www.myswitzerland.

Source: www.myswitzerland.

Unfortunately, that still didn’t do much to protect it from the wind. If you’re on the bridge while it’s windy, make sure to hold on tight and keep your footing — you might fly off!

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