Most corrupt countries in the OECD

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Global anti-corruption coalition, Transparency International, releases an annual list which ranks the perceived amount of corruption in each country around the world. The Corruption Perceptions Index, is a great way to find out which countries people generally think are the most corrupt.
Transparency International explains that there is no hard-and-fast way “to assess absolute levels of corruption in countries or territories on the basis of hard empirical data.”
However, the organization uses various factors and studies various corruption studies to provide us with a decent measure of corruption.
Not surprisingly, most of the top corrupt countries on the list are in Africa and the Middle East.
Instead of focus our list on the most corrupt countries in every region, we focused on the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).
We chose the most talked about and well-known countries and ranked them based on their level of corruption.
A score of 100 means there is no corruption in the country while a score of 1 would represent almost absolutely corruption.

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Denmark – 91

According to the Corruption Perceptions Index 2015 from Transparency International, Denmark is the World’s most transparent country. Since the report started in 1995, Denmark has remained as one of the four least corrupt countries in the world. A strict legal struction and constant oversight has helped the country maintain a level of transparency that should be envied by all countries

Source: www.iexplore.com

Source: www.iexplore.com

Sweden – 89

Swedish authorities have created a set of laws that fight against corruption in all forms. Officials are closely monitored and the country is considered to have some of the least corruption issues in the world

Source: www.linkedin.com

Source: www.linkedin.com

Netherlands – 87

The National Integrity System Assessment 2012, published by Transparency International Netherlands, reports that the country has established strong pillars — an independent judiciary, effective anti-corruption mechanisms and a culture of trust. Corruption is not a major concern in the country

Source: www.studyabroad.com

Source: www.studyabroad.com

Canada – 83

In recent years, corruption is increasingly a problem in government, industry and non-governmental organizations. Canada ranks towards the bottom of the bribery-fighting rankings, “with little or no enforcement of anti-bribery measures”

Source: studybridgeinternational.com

Source: studybridgeinternational.com

United Kingdom – 81

In September 2015, Lord Ashcroft published a biography of David Cameron, which suggested that the Prime Minister took drugs regularly in college. It also led to questions about the Prime Minister’s honesty with party donor’s known tax statuses as Lord Ashcroft suggested he had openly discussed his non-dom status with him in 2009. Still, the country fights against corruption and politicians are regularly examined to keep corruption to a minimum

Source: www.sju.edu

Source: www.sju.edu

Germany – 81

Corruption is not an obstacle for businesses in Germany, and companies are unlikely to encounter bribery or other corrupt practices. Fraud and corruption risks are most prevalent in the construction and health sectors, as well as in public procurement. Germany has laws in place that go after people who use illegal practices within their businesses and the country fights to ensure a fair society

Source: www.cedefop.europa.eu

Source: www.cedefop.europa.eu

Luxembourg – 81

This is another country where corruption isn’t a major issue for its citizens. Luxembourg regularly ranks as one of the most trusted countries in the world. With that being said a significant number of the surveyed households consider that the government’s fight against corruption “ineffective” and corruption has increased over the past several years

Source: ww.gapyear.com

Source: ww.gapyear.com

Australia – 79

This country has a “perceived” belief by its citizens that corruption is increasing. In reality, various studies have actually found Australia to be one of the least corrupt countries in the world. With that being said the country’s corruption score did slip by 1 point from 2014 to 2015

Source: www.lastminute.com

Source: www.lastminute.com

Austria – 76

In most cases, corrupt practices were related to conflicts of interest, abuse of office, money laundering and influence peddling. Politicians have come under fire in the country with two-thirds of citizens believing their politicians are corrupt

Source: www.icelandprocruises.com

Source: www.icelandprocruises.com

Iceland – 79

GRECO’s evaluation report in 2013 found that the Icelandic political system was weakened by potential nepotism, close personal relationships between public officials and business and political patronage at the local level. The country has done well though because business owners don’t find it hard to do business in the country

Source: science-all.com

Source: science-all.com

Belgium – 77

There is a lot of public trust in Belgium. The country lost some points because of “special favors” given to political projects that have cost the country hundreds of millions of dollars. The use of public money for politicians’ ambition is a common practice in the country

Source: www.ox.ac.uk

Source: www.ox.ac.uk

United States – 76

Dozens of high-level United States federal officials have been convicted of public corruption offenses for conduct while in office. Despite those convictions the country scores fairly well on the list. The US scored two points higher in 2015 than it did the year prior

Source: spea.indiana.edu

Source: spea.indiana.edu

Ireland – 75

Ireland is one of the least corrupt countries on the list in terms of major offenses. A 2015 documentary from the TV network RTE showed that politicians at all levels in the country had incorrectly declared their interests. Some councilors were even seeking cash payments in return for their services. Not the worst of offenses but still corruption none-the-less

Source: us.jnto.go.jp

Source: us.jnto.go.jp

Japan – 75

By global standards the country of Japan is not that corrupt. GAN Integrity’s anti-corruption portal notes that there is a traditional practice (known as amakudari) of assigning retired government officials to top positions within Japanese companies, unfortunately they are often not qualified for those roles

Source: www.allianceabroad.com

Source: www.allianceabroad.com

Chile – 70

Chile is one of the most corrupt nations in the OECD, but also the least corrupt in Latin America, where countries like Brazil, Venezuela, and Paraguay are wrought with bribery and fraud. The country’s score actually fell three points year-over-year

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Estonia – 70

In 2012, Estonia’s president, Toomas Hendrik Ilves, helped implement an anti-corruption act to increase transparency in the public sector. The countries score actually increased to 70 from 69

Source: www.france.com1

Source: www.france.com1

France – 70

Corruption is not massively widespread in France and GAN notes that “The Penal Code criminalizes active and passive bribery and bribery of national and foreign officials.

Source: escuderobrown.com

Source: escuderobrown.com

Portugal – 63

In an Ernst & Young survey in June 2015, 83% of Portuguese citizens said corruption and bribery were widespread in the country. Former Prime Minister Jose Socrates was detained on suspicion of tax fraud and money laundering. The country is not transparent but it still ranks decently well on the index

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Poland – 62

Poland just missed out on being one of the 10 most corrupt OECD nations. A survey in 2013 found that 83% of surveyed Polish citizens believe corruption is a major problem in their country. They specifically believe there is corruptions with politicians and the healthcare sector

Source: www.iexplore.com

Source: www.iexplore.com

Israel – 61

Israel scored 61 out of 100 in the Corruption Perceptions Index. The country’s score was determined after former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert was convicted of illegally taking more than $150,000 from an American business tycoon

Source: www.easyjet.com

Source: www.easyjet.com

Slovenia – 60

High-profile scandals have plagued Slovenia in recent years. Citizens also organized massive protests against Prime Minister Janez Janša and opposition leader Zoran Janković after they were accused of failing to properly declare their personal assets

Source: www.easyjet.com

Source: www.easyjet.com

Spain – 58

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy was accused of corruption just before he was re-elected. Just last week a new scandal hit the ruling Popular Party after 24 people were arrested following claims of bribery

Source: hookedoneverything.com

Source: hookedoneverything.com

Czech Republic – 56

The Czech Republic is doing something right. The country’s score has increased from 51 in last year’s survey to 56 this time around. The score was likely increased following the end of a major 2013 scandal that forced Prime Minister Petr Necas to resign

Source: usa-teachers.com

Source: usa-teachers.com

South Korea – 56

In 2015, Prime Minister Lee Wan-koo was forced to resign after being accused of taking bribes in the suicide note of a prominent businessman. His corruption hurt the country’s overall corruption score

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Source: en.wikipedia.org

Hungary – 51

Hungary lost three points year-over-year after giving doctors and surgeons a small bribe became widespread in the country, with one survey saying that 92% of Hungarians think it is an appropriate thing to do if they want to receive the best medical care possible

Source: www.tripadvisor.co.uk

Source: www.tripadvisor.co.uk

Slovakia – 51

Slovakia is considered one of the most corrupt countries in Europe. In recent years the country has come under attack from a Gorilla Scandal, in which politicians, officials, and business executives were accused of taking and giving bribes to secure contracts

Source: www.adventuresbydisney.com

Source: www.adventuresbydisney.com

Greece – 46

The country scored 46 points compared with 43 last year. The country’s still low score is largely due to the practice of “fakelaki,” a colloquial term for bribes given to get better service. The practice is believed to be widespread in the country

www.surprisingitaly.com

www.surprisingitaly.com

Italy – 44

Italy is the Eurozone’s third-biggest economy and its corruption is largely attributed to former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, who has been accused of corruption numerous times, was convicted of tax fraud in 2013, and was found guilty of bribing a senator in 2015. Your country is only as good as your leader

Source: nobarriersforeuropeans.com

Source: nobarriersforeuropeans.com

Turkey – 42

Turkey is the most corrupt country in Europe. In 2013, the country was hit by a scandal that involved the director of a state-owned bank, and many senior business people who allegedly took part in bribery, fraud, smuggling, and money laundering

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Mexico – 35

Mexico is the OECD’s most corrupt country. This shouldn’t surprise many people considering the country’s control of the drug trade. Notorious drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán has managed to escape prison twice. He was known to give prison guards very large bribes to secure his freedom.

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